Jonathan D. Sarna

Learning from History

Jonathan Sarna looks back at a time when both Reform and Orthodox Judaism in America seemed imperiled.

A Movement Strikes Back

Seven leaders and a historian respond to Daniel Gordis’ “Requiem for a Movement.”

President Grant and the Chabadnik

In 1869, President Grant received an unexpected visitor at the White House: Haim Zvi Sneersohn, a flamboyant and eccentric Chabad emmisary from Jerusalem. Bedecked in what The New York Times described as an "Oriental costume" consisting of a "rich robe of silk, a white damask surplice, a fez, and a splendid Persian shawl fastened about his waist," he strode self-confidently toward the president. Grant instinctively rose to greet him.


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