Reviews

Life with S'chug


Balaboosta: Bold Mediterranean Recipes to Feed the People You Love

by Einat Admony

Artisan Books, 288 pp., $29.95

Try Out a Bonus Feature from the JRB App!

Learn to make hummus with Einat Admony.

Download the JRB app to access all bonus features.

Mobile App

Named after one of her two restaurants in downtown Manhattan, Einat Admony’s Balaboosta: Bold Mediterranean Recipes to Feed the People You Love weaves together an eclectic collection of recipes with personal vignettes of growing up in Israel and of life as a professional chef, mother, and wife in New York City. Admony, who is now opening a third restaurant in the West Village, also cooks for her kids, wakes up at night to concoct elaborate sandwiches for her husband, and cannot hold back from inviting friends over for dinner in her family’s Brooklyn loft several times a week. Apart from owning up to being unable to shed those extra 40 pounds, she seems capable of doing it all.

Einat Admony

Einat Admony serves family and friends. (Photo by Quentin Bacon. Courtesy of Balaboosta by Einat Admony, Artisan Books, © 2013.)

Having grown into a genre in its own right, the food memoir, complete with the prerequisite black-and-white photographs of elderly family members, poignant anecdotes, and nostalgic reminiscences, is only as entertaining as its protagonist. High-spirited, feisty, and down-to-earth, Admony is the kind of woman who comforts herself over heartbreak with a batch of sufganiyot, noting that “Revenge is always sweet, but all the more so when it’s filled with jelly.” Elsewhere in her narrative, she devises a “morning orgasm cocktail” to make up for the downsides of life with two small children. Her account of the sheer pleasure taken in cooking for, and eating with, her loved ones bursts with straightforward, no-nonsense enthusiasm for food and life.

This article is locked

Subscribe now for immediate and unlimited access to Web + Print + App + Archive
  • Already a subscriber? Log in to continue reading.
  • Not quite ready to subscribe? Register now for your choice of 3 FREE articles per quarter.
  • Already a registered user? Log in here.

About the Author

Talya Halkin is a writer and translator in Tel Aviv.

Comments

No comments yet.


Want to post a comment? Please register or log in.

Most Read

What Jesus Wasn’t: Zealot

When Fox News' Lauren Green asked Reza. . .

Conservative Judaism: A Requiem

In 1971, 41 percent of American Jews. . .

Editors' Picks

Paradox or Pluralism?

Walzer’s paradox of liberation, if. . .

Lucky Grossman

Vasily Grossman was one of the principal. . .

The Future Past Perfect

Treasure and tragedy in the letters of. . .

In The Next JRB

  • Matti Friedman on Sons and Soldiers
  • Rachel Biale on We Were the Future
  • Bernard Wasserstein on Mark Mazower What You Did Not Tell
  • And more...
Copyright © 2017 Jewish Review of Books. All Rights Reserved. | Site by W&B