Letters

Features

Hollywood’s Anti-Nazi Spies

In 1934, Hollywood's Jewish moguls met secretly at the Hillcrest Country Club to hear an unusual pitch. A former ADL official was running a network of World War I veterans who had infiltrated the local Nazi organization. The intelligence was alarming, and he needed funding.

Pew’s Jews: Religion Is (Still) the Key

Who are the “Jews of no religion” in the much-discussed Pew Research Center's “A Portrait of Jewish Americans”? It’s a question that gets at the deep structures of Jewish life and the inadequacy of many of the sociological methods used to describe it. 

Conservative Judaism: A Requiem

In 1971, 41 percent of American Jews were part of the Conservative movement. Today it's 18 percent and falling fast. What happened? Maybe its leaders never knew what Conservative Judaism was really about.

Reviews

The Devil You Know

Alvin H. Rosenfeld in 2013: “How aggressive this new antisemitism is likely to get and, ultimately, how destructive it will be if it proceeds unchecked are open questions.”

Readings

Bambi’s Jewish Roots

Felix Salten was a hack who cultivated ties to the Habsburg court and wrote the bestselling memoir of a fictional prostitute. He was also a charismatic Zionist who outshone Buber on the stage and—not so coincidentally—wrote Bambi.

Lost & Found

Last Word

Salsa and Sociology

When I was a child, eight or nine, I evolved a theory about different kinds of Jews, based, more or less, on the hot sauce we kept on our table.

Past Issues